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  1. #1
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    alphatonez's Avatar
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    Brainworx bx_cleansweep v2.3 - free hipass/lowpass filter (AU/VST)

    Brainworx bx_cleansweep

    bx_cleansweep is a 32/64 bit Hi-Pass and Lo-Pass filter plug-in, introducing the new “Anti Crush Technology” (originally developed by Brainworx)


    bx_cleansweep


    Analog style filter curves without the typical Nyquist problems, in a new great sounding filter design (taken from our pro mastering EQ bx_digital V2). First order filters (6 dB per octave) guarantee an extremely musically sounding filter set, and unique joystick control (taken from bx_hybrid) gives you fast and intuitive control.

    bx_cleansweep is the plugin that should go into every mix channel as the first plugin. This way you can filter out any unwanted hi-end and lo-end, and the result is a clean and tight mix.

    Ever thought about why there are Hi-Pass and Lo-Pass filter in every channel of the most expensive analog consoles (SSL, NEVE, etc.), but why most EQs are missing this feature?

    Features
    • BRAINWORX critically acclaimed filter
    • Fully automatable
    • Dedicated BYPASS switch in the plug-in GUI
    • "Mouse Over" feature: adjust the parameters by holding the mouse over any knob and simply turn your mouse wheel
    • Direct access: just type in any valid number into the text fields for direct access to the exact value


    Website & Download

  2. #2
    Senior Member moose's Avatar
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    I am a bit late on this one but still...

    A great High/Low Pass filter indeed.
    The only 1 thing I don't like about it is the inability to change the cut steepness. It is fixed at 6db per octave which is fine in most situations and (my guess) was chosen because it is also the most musical, as in "not noticeable".
    BUT...
    ...quite often, specially in a busy mix, I need a more severe cut, particularly on the low region. To my ears a "musical" aka gentle 6db sweep is far more useful when cutting the High side of things.

    For example 6db per octave cut on the Lows would not really suffice when trying to separate the kickdrum from the bass guitar, or the ukulele from the acoustic guitar (whadda you mean you don't play a ukulele? Everyone should!!!)

  3. #3
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    Want more cut? Use two filters in series.

  4. #4
    Senior Member moose's Avatar
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    That is true but when I have 24 or more audio tracks open, each already packed with plugins it becomes essential that I try to maximize the vsts I am already using.
    Unfortunately my PC is not that powerful and in those circumstances it starts to break-up.

    I have found that a good alternative to Brainworx Cleansweep is Fabfilter Simplon. Very good sounding (as in transparent) but lots of features.

  5. #5
    Senior Member moose's Avatar
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    We all work differently so I guess there are no hard rules.

    I work nearly ONLY with real instruments wit the odd piano or strings added (and drumkit, when needed) and I like to record my instruments as faithful to the original as possible, so I "eq" at the recording level only by moving the mic around 'till I have the most satisfactory sound and by choosing the right mic pre (I don't have many but the Focusrite Liquid56 can "imitate" 10 different pres.)

    Once all instruments are recorded I place a low-cut filter on each and every channel in the mixer, cutting everything below 40Hz. Bass or drumkit might get a cut at 35Hz if suitable, while other instruments like guitars might get a cut at between 70 and 120Hz.. whatever works best on the specific, but they ALL get their low-cut filter.

    The difference with this approach compared to the same mix without the low-cut on every channel is like night and day.

  6. #6
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    I work nearly ONLY with LIVE instruments... Mixing to a PA system rather than a recording.

    Depending on what I am mixing I will either use The Large Mixing Desk or The Small Mixing Desk.


    The large mixing desk has a HPF on every channel. It's importance is denoted by the fact that it is second only to the trim control in the panel layout. It gets used on everything, always.


    The small mixing desk only has a HPF on the outputs. While this is useful, it is nowhere near as effective as filtering the channels on input. Sometimes, in a difficult room or on a difficult stage, I really miss those channel filters.


    I don't know how this relates to studio mixing. But clearing out the mud from the mix before wading in with EQs seems like a good strategy to me.

    tB.

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